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Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.



Hilgay All Saints Church, Now locked on a daily basis due to thieves, (Cut their hands off) This parish church, with it's brick tower built in 1794. And body of the church in Norfolk carrstone, with ashlar dressings, it has some signs of wear, but at a young 61 so have I!  The church has the distinction of being the home of one George William Manby  (see Separate)  it has a late 14th century south aisle, nave and chancel. The roofs are of slate, It has also a two-stage tower supported by angle buttresses to first stage, where belfry is set back at string course. shown outside are arched belfry windows with timber trellis screen. It still has its poppyhead pews, carved ends and a pulpit of stone, probably by Street. The font with its bird topped cover stands majestically on 5 legs, 1 main pedestal of stone, surrounds by others made of marble. Hilgay used to have a Priory, this was for the Benedictines Order, and set at Modney Priory, the founder and date unknown, but was a cell to Ramsey Abbey in Huntingdonshire. It was in existence in 1291, and at that time was valued at £3 18s, a large amount in this day's.


Hilgay All Saints Church, hero Captain George William Manby FRS (8 November 1765 – 18 November 1854) was an English author and inventor. He designed an apparatus for saving life from shipwrecks and also the first modern form of fire extiquisher/cannon.

Manby went to school at Downham Market. Although he claimed to have been a friend there of Horatio Nelson of Burnham Market, this is unlikely to be true as Nelson would have left the school (if he ever attended) before Manby started. He volunteered to fight in the American War of Independence, aged 17, but was rejected because of his youth and his small size. Instead, he entered the RMA, Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, and then joined the Cambridgeshire Militia where he gained the rank of captain.

He married in 1793 and inherited his wife's family's estates, but left her in 1801 after being shot by her lover and moved to Clifton Bristol.  On Napoleon's plans to invade England, he came to the attention of the Secretary of War, Charles Yorke, who was impressed and recommended Manby to be appointed as Barrack-Master at Great Yarmouth.

On 18 February 1807, as a helpless onlooker, he witnessed a Naval ship, H.M.S. Snipe run aground 60 yards off Great Yarmouth during a storm, with (according to some accounts) a total of 214 people drowned, including French prisoners of war, women and children. Following this tragedy, Manby experimented with mortars, and so invented the "Manby Mortar", later developed into the "Breechers Buoy", that fired a thin rope from shore into the rigging of a ship in distress. A strong rope, attached to the thin one, could be pulled aboard the ship. His successful invention followed an experiment as a youth in 1783, when he shot a mortar carrying a line over Downham church. His invention was officially adopted in 1814, and a series of mortar stations were established around the coast. It was estimated that by the time of his death nearly 1000 persons had been rescued from stranded ships by means of his apparatus.

An earlier, similar design to Manby's invention was made in the late 18th century by the French agronomist and inventor Jacques Joseph Ducarne de Blangy  Manby's invention was independently arrived at, and there is no suggestion that he copied de Blangy's idea.

Manby also built an "unsinkable" ship. The first test indeed proved it to be floating when mostly filled with water; however, the seamen (who disliked Manby) rocked the boat back and forth, so that it eventually turned over. The boatmen depended on the cargo left over from shipwrecks, and may have thought Manby's mortar a threat to their livelihood.

In 1813 Manby invented the "Extincteur", the first portable pressurised fire extinquisher.

He was the first to advocate a national fire brigade, and is considered by some to be a true founder of the RNLI. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1831 in recognition of his many accomplishments.

In later life Manby became obsessed with Nelson, turning his house into a Nelson museum filled with memorabilia and living in the basement.


Hilgay All Saints Church,Postcode:

Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Some of the things that can be seen on this site are:
Aisle, Flint, Font, Gallery, Altar, Flying Buttress, Gargoyle, Annunciation, Galilee Porches, Antiphonal, Lectern,Gothic, Grotesque, Apse, Gnomon, Hatchments, IHS, Ambulatory, Glossary, ruined churches, seven sacrament fonts, stained coloured windows, churches of Norfolk, A-Z meaning of church list, religious or pilgrim badges, carvings, naves, alters, graffiti, door knobs, Roman, Saxon, videos.


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Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.
Hilgay All Saints Church.