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Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church,



Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church. Square west tower, a clock and 6 bells, nave, north and south transepts, chancel, and north and south porches, the former being used as a vestry. The style is a mixture of all three periods of Gothic, the transepts and chancel have been poor Classic windows. The clock in the tower was presented by Lady Amelia Pelham, in 1838. There are a number of tablets to former rectors. There are several monuments to the Cooke family, 1766-1843 and to the Thursby and other families. Bergh Apton Saint Martin. was another parish, Apton and Apton Burgh, Saint Martin at Apton fell completely to decay, and nothing remains above the ground. Much altered about 1837, when the battlements and the north transept were added and the south transept and chancel remodelled. The chancel still has arched windows. Those in the transepts have intersected tracery. The font is octagonal. And against the stems are four lions and four statuettes. Against the bowl the signs of the four Evangelists and four elegant standing angels. There is stained glass in the east window by Kempe, 1910.A south window 1885 and a north window 1894, both by Ward and Hughes, that Pevsner say are terrible. Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church. Has its roots deep in the past, for here the Romans pitched their tents and made their camp, and in that camp the English built their cross shaped church. It stands on the mound which Caesar's legions either found or raised in this place. We imagine they found it here, for near it have been found Bronze Age swords and the burial urns of the earliest fighting tribes in Eastern Britain. Standing finely on a hill, the church looks out on a wooded countryside a mile from the village. Its nave and tower are 14th century except for the battlements. It has little to see, but there are two Jacobean chairs with quaint faces in their mass of carving, and a magnificent font with angels round the bowl, more angels under it and men and lions round the stem. In 1965, an image of Saint Paul was discovered in a cottage wall in this village. The organ is built or constructed by Norman & Beard Ltd of London. The origins of the company are from a business founded in Diss in 1870 by Ernest William Norman (1851 - 1927). In 1876 he moved to Norwich where he went into partnership with his brother, Herbert John Norman (1861 - 1936). In 1887 they went into partnership with George A. Wales Beard, and the company was formed. In 1896 the company opened a second office in London. They worked closely with Robert Hope-Jones and held the patents on many of his developments, including electro-pneumatic action. The company merged with William Hill and Sons of London in 1916, and became William Hill and Son & Norman and Beard Ltd. 

Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, Postcode: NR15-1BX

Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church
Bergh Apton, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church