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Blundeston Saint Mary the Virgin Church


Blundeston Saint Mary the Virgin Church, nothing remains of an earlier church, but in 988, the present flint tower was constructed and about a century later a stone church added on. only the north doorway and font remain. A larger building replaced that Norman church around the 14th century. The nave of this Norman church still intact. The church was much enriched in the 15th century, the church was completely redecorated under a Youth Opportunities Programme (YOP) scheme, by young unemployed  who also constructed the arched lampholder over the church gates. The churches village was the scene for the opening chapters of the Charles Dickens rendition of David Copperfield. the font is Norman as afore mentioned, it was then reformed and reshaped in the 15th century to turn it into an octagonal one and more into a style that was being fashioned at the time. The base is more recent. the church has a squint, a small round opening to the right of the tower arch, its unusual, though there is another at nearby Lound. The pews are of oak, and dated around 1850s. The church has a west tower, nave, vestry, chancel, screen of around 1490, this similar to that of Somerleyton, but wider, houselling benches, pulpit, and here a priest's stool and dais, they were constructed in 1985 from old pew timber. Instead of the more normal Saints, the pictures are images of the Angels of the Passion, now badly faded. There are memorials to the Rev, Gregory Clarke who founded the Blundeston School (1726) and two other brasses for the Sydnor family. there is a coat of Arms to Charles II. Under the stoup is a grotesue head beneath, its said to be Norman, the only other I have seen so far being at Happisburgh. The font  beside the priests door on the south side is Norman and came from Saint Andrew's Flixton, now a ruin. The porch contains two scratch dials. The church is now called Blundeston with Flixton.

Blundeston Saint Mary the Virgin Church