[google9e69c0a38572f0b4.html]
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh All Saints Church IP21 4NQ



Dickleburgh, All Saints Church, There is evidence that the church of All Saints, Dickleburgh, is not the first church for Christian worship in this lovely Norfolk village. In a charter dated around 1050, there is reference of two former priests. The building is made of flint, an easy found material in Norfolk, and freestone quoins, the tower is strengthened at the corner for added strength. A Tudor brick stair turret protrudes on the outside of the northern face of the tower. The front porch outside courts an amount of masonry with cut stone crowns, inside Nikolaus Pevsner mentions a good description of the nave arches, these he says are of the Decorated Period. There is an unusual rood screen where only the bottom has survived. An octagonal font with shields of Holy Trinity, Bury Abbey, The Passion and Blessed Sacrament. The base is of alternating Lions and Wildmen. ( Dickleburgh, is one of only around six which step down, the others being Ashwellthorpe, Burgh Parva, Helhoughton, Shelton and Wickhampton) There is a monument by Edward Marshall of London for Dame Frances Playters 1659. To aide some family trees, some Everetts farmers at Dickleburgh, and Fairheads were farmers at Banham in the 50s.

Dickleburgh, All Saints Church, IP21-4NQ.
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,
Dickleburgh, All Saints Church,