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Fakenham Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church.
Fakenham Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church.


The day I called to Fakenham Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, there was a "Messy" day taking place, I'd already looked for a parking space nearby to no avail, had been given a parking ticket for over staying my welcome, (when I hadn't really) The Car Park,stated in large lettering Two Hours FREE! Small writing, you must get a ticket. This is NOT on in 2018. Many people would have paid the £60 fine, or if forced the £100 follow up fine. Unless the car park is council owned, there is really no need. With the Messy Day, there were too many young children around, I wouldn't take photos. Because of this and the parking, it will be a while, unless invited back, of taking inside pictures. The hand of individuals is often discernible, even if we cannot attribute names to them, A good example is provided by masons marks at New Buckenham and Weasenham Saint Peter. Recently Richard Fawcett made a major contribution to techniques of architectural history by showing that the same decorative features could be seen in more than one church, and therefore reveal the work of "Schools" of masons, or even of individuals. Thus, he had demonstrated at Hockwold, Larling and Croxton. They all have the same simple tracery of the early 14th century; that a particular kind of elongated quatrefoil was used in the Attleborough area after 1320, and has links to Norwich Cathedral and that the towers of Blofield, Brisley, Fakenham, Foulsham, Heydon, Ingham and Southrepps were all the work of one man in the mid-15th century and that a mason who designed Wiveton Saint Mary worked elsewhere in Norfolk in the second quarter of the 15th century. Fakenham Church is imposing, but does not contain much except the fine 14th century sedilia and some brasses. Parts of the screen seem to be the 14th century. Standing beside the market place, (this spreads through several streets and usually on a day of the James Beck Auction ) its 500 year-old tower impressive with panelled buttresses climbing to a crown of battlements and pinnacles, arcading round the base, and a great west window over the doorway with a niche at each side. The doorway is enriched with Passion symbols, the Royal Arms and crowned letters representing the Duchy of Lancaster. John of Gaunt was Lord of the Manor here, and the Lancastrian monogram and arms are seen again on the old font. The big porch with a parvise room above was built in 1497, and is said to have been used as a powder magazine. The rest of the spacious cleretoried church, lighted by windows with flowing tracery, is nearly 600 years old. The chancel screen has 14th century tracery below a new embattled cornice. The carved almsbox is a year older than the Great Fire of London. A bulky varnished chest has three locks, one for the Reverend and one each for Churchwardens. There is nothing else so beautiful inside as the tall canopied sedilia and piscina in the chancel, richly carved and dotted with flowers. A few of many brasses remain, chiefly 15th century and battered. One is a figure of a priest, and among other fragments, is a woman with a rosary, wearing veiled headdress and a gown with girdle, fur cuffs, and wide collar. On a floorstone of the nave are four hearts, which are each engraved with the prayer, "Jhu merci ladi help".

Fakenham Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church. Postcode:
Fakenham Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church.