[google9e69c0a38572f0b4.html]
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.

Guestwick, Saint Peter Church,



Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, Guestwick, a relatively remote church, that I was especially proud to see its display of draped "Poppies Memorial" it is both inside and out and a brilliant reminder to the fallen. Guestwick, means Thwaite (meadow) belonging to Guist, a village four miles to the west! And excavation of the church by Gressenhall Archaeological team showed the church had previously a Saxon church on the site, only the tower of that church remains. The later church was built on its south side. The Saxon Church was small and narrow with an axial tower (as at Great Dunham and Newton by Castle Acre, the latter one of my favourite churches) its chancel was short with a semi circular apse and the nave was only half the length of the present building. Guestwick Saint Peter’s churchyard is in the early stages of conservation management, and presently supports the following grassland species to look out for: the damp-loving and delicate cuckoo flower, red campion, comfrey, primrose, garlic mustard, dog’s mercury (an ancient woodland indicator species), lesser celandine, snowdrop, sorrel, red dead-nettle, burdock and lords and ladies. The strip of sward following the historic line of a path from the disused gate in the north-eastern corner is the most floristically interesting, and here bulbous buttercup, common knapweed and a patch of ox-eye daisy make an appearance. Polypody fern, germander speedwell, lesser stitchwort and dog violet can also all be discovered on the bordering roadside verges. The church itself hosts hart’s-tongue fern within buttresses and black spleenwort in the stonework above the stunning Millenium window. Bats are also recorded as roosting in the church, including natterers bats, long-eared bats and the common pipistrelle. In the summer months, the areas of uncut grassland are a productive haven for an array of insects and other invertebrates. The uniquely located central tower of Saint Peter’s is the oldest part of the church and is all that remains of the original Saxon church sited here, the body of the church being rebuilt in the 15th century. A church which moved southwards, leaving behind its central tower. Excavation in 1983 revealed an apsodal chancel aligned with the Saxo-Norman tower There is a blocked arch and scar of gable. A central wall belongs to a later vestry. Visitors will notice the beautiful ‘Millennium window’ depicting regional wildlife and made by local resident Adam O’Grady, along with the reassembled, but original stained glass windows in the south aisle.


Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.


Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Some of the things that can be seen on this site are:
Aisle, Flint, Font, Gallery, Altar, Flying Buttress, Gargoyle, Annunciation, Galilee Porches, Antiphonal, Lectern,Gothic, Grotesque, Apse, Gnomon, Hatchments, IHS, Ambulatory, Glossary, ruined churches, seven sacrament fonts, stained coloured windows, churches of Norfolk, A-Z meaning of church list, religious or pilgrim badges, carvings, naves, alters, graffiti, door knobs, Roman, Saxon, videos.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.
Guestwick, Saint Peter Church, NR20-5QJ.