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Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.

Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.



Heydon's Saint Peter and Saint Paul's Church, a beautiful church in beautiful surroundings. On arrival I parked and walked across the village green. Older than it first looks inside, despite it's modernisations that have gone on over the years, Heydon has indeed found wall paintings opened up when these re-decoratings were taking place. The wall paintings, seemed to have been covered up as with many, many Norfolk churches. Memorials too put on top of that white wall paint that did the covering up, as with Heydon too, rood screens were either pulled down or covered up. Thankfully the latter was said for Heydon's church regarding this. Some uncovered in 1934-35 by the friends of the then Earle/Earl that was built and decorated in the 15th century! Heydon has one of my favourite style pulpits, "Wine Glass shape" this one 15th century, Also the pulpit has a sounding board, this added later, stairs too, around 1894. Heydon's Saint Peter and Saint Paul's Church, west tower, both south and north porches, nave, north and south aisles and chancel. This beautifully kept church and churchyard, has a 15th century tower with sound holes and crocketted pinnacles and battlement. The 15th century west doors were traceried with small quatrefoils as a border and the15th century porch is groined and has I think our Lord in Glory on the central boss, and subsidary bosses with angels. There is a parvise over. Inside it has a lofty tower arch, 14th arcades with a clerestory of 15th century windows interspersed with quatrefoils, these latter being probably the original clerestory windows. Simple arch-braced roof to nave and good arch-braced roofs to aisles with traceried spandrils. A few old plain poppy-headed benches and a 15th century pulpit with traceried panels. Jacobean backboard and canopy. On the back board is carved the Last Supper , probably Flemish. The font is 13th century and the lofty vaulted screen with its original colour, diapered panels, and inscribed middle rail was erected by John Dynne in 1480. Alas, it is terribly retored. Fragments of 15th century glass in south west tracery lights is all that remains of the priceless glass that formerly existed, showing a Christ of the Trades. A good set of Annes's Arms framed, also found were a number of wall paintings, these were previously covered up, both with paint and then with monuments. These on the north aisle wall is an excellent medieval wall painting, lost for centuries beneath coats of whitewash. It was only discovered during restoration work in the 1970s. The painting depicts two kings, part of a larger scene depicting the Three Living and Three Dead. The theme is mortality, a common one during the 14th century, when memories of the Black Death were fresh and painful. The kings are given a stark message by the dead; 'As you are so once were we. As we are so you shall be' The figures of the kings are separated by a pair of 18th century tablets, and you can just see a figure of a skeleton visible above the upper tablet. At the east end of the aisle is two scenes showing Salome dancing before King Herod. Why two scenes of the same subject? The painting appear to have been made at different times, suggesting that they formed part of a much larger sequence that was entirely repainted. It may have been part of the decoration scheme for a chapel dedicated to St John the Baptist, which makes sense given the Salome depiction. In the south aisle is yet another medieval painting showing the Magi giving their gifts to the Christ child. The hand of individuals is often discernible, even if we cannot attribute names to them, A good example is provided by masons marks at New Buckenham and Weasenham Saint Peter. Recently Richard Fawcett made a major contribution to techniques of architectural history by showing that the same decorative features could be seen in more than one church, and therefore reveal the work of "Schools" of masons, or even of individuals. Thus, he had demonstrated at Hockwold, Larling and Croxton. They all have the same simple tracery of the early 14th century; that a particular kind of elongated quatrefoil was used in the Attleborough area after 1320, and has links to Norwich Cathedral and that the towers of Blofield, Brisley, Fakenham, Foulsham, Heydon, Ingham and Southrepps were all the work of one man in the mid-15th century and that a mason who designed Wiveton Saint Mary worked elsewhere in Norfolk in the second quarter of the 15th century.

Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.
Heydon, Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, NR11-6AD.