[google9e69c0a38572f0b4.html]
Honing Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church NR28 9QW


Honing Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church, Honing or Haninga, meaning: the people at the hill, rock. Old English han (rock) + ingas (the people of). A church has been here in Honing for some 600 years, the present church has been much modified over the centuries. Originally built in the 1300s mainly from knapped flint, the church building has undergone significent changes. most notable were made in 1795 when the chancel and sanctuary were reduced in length by 16feet. This can be seen outside the churches east end where the removed consecrated area of the chancel and sanctuary is now demarcated by iron railings. The width of the church was reduced by 10 feet as is evidenced by the very narrow north and south aisles. The church has an octagonal 15th century font with traceried stem and eight animal and grotesque heads supporting its plain chamfered bowl, the bowl has been reduced in height and is now topped with an octagonal 13th century Purbeck marble bowl with two incised pointed arches to each facet. A wooden font cover of 20th century design tops the bowl. The pews and pulpit, choir stalls, altar and Communion rails were designed by Edward Cubitt of Honing Hall and were made in 1928-1929 by cornish and Gaymers of North Walsham from Norfolk grown oak. There are monuments to members of the Chamber and Cubitt families in the church. The lecturn was given in 1931 to the church by Honing members of the Young Women's Christian Association. near North Walsham, Honing has a square west tower, 5 bells, nave, chancel and south porch. The tower is a fine lofty example of the Perpendicular period, the rest of the church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1795, when the aisles were removed and the arcading built up form solid walls. The windows are copies of the late 13th century type. the church holds registers dated from 1630. Please note the foot and hand prints on the wooden benches in the south porch. Seen often in Norfolk churches, one wonders if these are a pilgrim thing. Marking off the place where they left their shoes, like in Walsingham, when they left their footwear at the slipper chapel, to prilgrimage to another church. Another theory is by Gilchrist notes the medieval connections between shoe symbolism and the wedding ceremony, where brides were presented with shoes, or their fathers presented a shoe to the groom, symbolising the ‘transfer of male authority’, it is unclear whether any of the graffiti examples might have had a similar relationship to matrimony. Hands, feet and shoes are relatively common in East Anglian churches such as Litcham (Norfolk), Ludham (Norfolk), Morston (Norfolk) and Cowlinge (Suffolk),the sheer quantity, and identifiable distribution patterns, present at Troston make the site worthy of note and further study.

Honing Saint Peter and Saint Paul Church NR28 9QW