[google9e69c0a38572f0b4.html]
Ingham Holy Trinity Church NR12 9AB


Ingham Holy Trinity Church, near Stalham, square west tower, 2 bells, nave, aisles, chancel, and south porch with parvis over, built for the sacrist who was also the vicar. Up to the time of the Dissolution it was collegate and monastic as well as parochial. Mainly 14th century and 15th century work. Portions of the priory remain, and there was also a cloister. On the north side of the chancel is an altar tomb with recumbent effigy to Sir Oliver de Ingham, Seneschal of Guyenne in 1325. He died in 1344. The effigy, like that of SirRoger de Kerdeston at Reepham reposes on a mattress of pebbles see Knights and Knights templar of Norfolk. And the position is idential. Many valuable brasses were stolen in 1800, when Saint Mary's Chapel was pulled down. A singular brass still remains with effigies of Sir Miles de Stapleton, the founder of the Priory. On one of the brasses to a Knight and his lady is included the name of Jakke, their dog. Only one other case in the whole of England of a dog's name being given in a church. There are miserere seats in the chancel Part of the font is said to be Saxon. Registers from 1801, previous ones destroyed by fire. The church, originally a conventual church of a priory, still has the remains of those buildings including the cloisters on the north side. The tower is very fine with flush panelled base course, grouped door and west window with trail between the two, good traceried sound holes and flush panelled buttreses and parapet. Three storied porch plainly groined on the ground floor. 14th century lofty arcades with four circular traceried clerestory windows above. There are a few old bench ends in the aisles, otherwise modern roofs and fittings. There are the remains of a stone screen, or probably pulpitum, as it was a conventional church. Recently Richard Fawcett made a major contribution to techniques of architectural history by showing that the same decorative features could be seen in more than one church, and therefore reveal the work of "Schools" of masons, or even of individuals. Thus, he had demonstrated at Hockwold, Larling and Croxton. They all have the same simple tracery of the early 14th century; that a particular kind of elongated quatrefoil was used in the Attleborough area after 1320, and has links to Norwich Cathedral and that the towers of Blofield, Brisley, Fakenham, Foulsham, Heydon, Ingham and Southrepps were all the work of one man in the mid-15th century and that a mason who designed Wiveton Saint Mary worked elsewhere in Norfolk in the second quarter of the 15th century. Saw some nice people here, the lady who I was speaking to about the excessive parking from the public house next door and no space for the church, especially the disabled. The chap called Michael on a bike from Stalham way and the beautiful lady exercising and walking through the churchyard that gave me clues as to the records of duck/goose tagging in the church. My last church for the day, and one of my favourites.

Ingham Holy Trinity Church NR12 9AB