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Kempstone Saint Paul Ruin.
Kempstone Saint Paul Ruin.


Kempstone Saint Paul Ruin, On the grounds of my old ex boss David that whilst I worked as a youngster (9-15) at G.A. Wilson of Terrington St Clement. Kempstone has fallen into disrepair. Kempstone is close to nearby Flitcham, maybe the reason for its demise! Kempstone or Kemston Saint Paul Church ruin stands now in weeds and woodland, with its west tower, nave and chancel, this derelict church with its 14th century plain tower, a stoup on the inside, its south door and simple 15th century font with traceried bowl and pedestal. At the time of H. Munro Cautley, there were mention of box pews, a simple trefoil headed piscina, Stuart rails and a 17th century drop-handled bier, with the unusual feature of cross bearers at each end. Kempstone Saint Paul ruin as written by Messent, Square west tower, a clock 8 bells, nave with aisle, chancel and north porch. it contains work of all three periods of Gothic. The ancient font is of interest. There are several memorials to the Fitzroy family, it also has a Piscina in the chancel. What happened to all this? All that survives of the village of Kempstone is a farm and Kempstone Lodge, a grand 18th-century house. The church stands just south-west of the Lodge. The site is 1 mile south of Litcham, and can be reached by a track off the lane to Great Dunham. The church was in good condition when drawn by Ladbrooke in c. 1830, it is now in a very sorry state. The ditch-lined churchyard survives, but has become a copse and trees stand right up to the walls of the church. A large beech tree adjacent to the chancel is actually growing into the north wall. The collapsed and collapsing masonry of the church are a considerable danger. When visited in 1978, the chancel arch was cracked and deformed; by 1983, it had fallen in. The earliest dateable feature is the double-splayed window in the nave south wall. These usually belong to the 11th century, either side of the Conquest of 1066. The western two-thirds of the nave south wall belong to this phase; the south-·west quoins may also belong, but it was impossible to see them. Possibly the north-west quoins are likewise 11th-century; this wall continues up to the north door, from which a thicker wall proceeds (maybe the offset noted in the north wall further east picks up the original wall again). The earliest feature of the chancel is the Decorated east window, dateable like nearby Beeston to the 1340s. Chancel arch and additional windows in nave and chancel are Perpendicular. The west tower, to judge from its ground-floor window, is Perpendicular also. There are several 18th-century additions, including the nave north window, and buttresses north and south of the chancel arch. 19th century work includes the rebuilding of the chancel north wall. The open fireplace and flue built into the chancel south window are probably early 19th century. The nave roof was retiled as late as 1904.

Kempstone Saint Paul Ruin,Postcode:
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