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Norwich Saint Gregory Church



Norwich Saint Gregory Church, St Gregory's Church, Norwich is a Grade I listed redundant parish church, It is the most easterly of the five churches along St Benedicts Street, has a beautiful metal door-handle, a fine brass eagle of 1496, an ancient pall and cope, and a wall painting of Saint George and the Dragon. wfrom the alley way, est tower, north and south porches, nave, north and south aisles and chancel. The plan is very unusual with the porches projecting from the north and south faces of the tower. the aisles stop one bay short of east end, and allow of large windows on either side, and there are nine steps up to the altar to permit of a processional path. But now it is a public alley way.  under the chancel is the crypt which is now approached from the alley-way, but formerly from the church. The south porch has a canoopied niche over the entrance and both porches have groined ceilings with parvises above. The tower has a groined ringing gallery, above this very unusual vaulting. The corners are first vaulted to an octagon and gracefully groined above to a bell hole. Pitched roof to nave with an arch-braced tie-beam and traces of colour. Very nice 15th century octagonal font with traceried bowl, with deep corona and a slender panelled shaft which stands on human and animal heads. There is a nice Jacobean font cover. 15th century arcades and the walls of aisles are arcaded with piers projecting 16", the re-entrant angles being rounded off. In north aisle is a huge painting of saint George and the Dragon as before mentioned and in the south aisle the Arms of Charles II, trhe pattern fretted out. This obviously stood over the screen, and you now see the back which faced east, for  the lion and unicorn supporters are reversed. There are three panels of the old base of screen, showing Saint John the Baptist, Barbara and the Angel. On the vestry door is fixed a remarkable ring handle, formerly on the south door. It shows a wold holding a head with bifurcated beard, possibly Saint Edmund. the chancel has a beautiful brass eagle lectern dated 1493, four misericordes, and an old embroidered pall or bier cover with little angels bearing the souls up to Heaven. The Norfolk Almanac of Disasters wrote "1806 15th January, saw another rough day in the county, when the vane and spindle of Saint Gregory's Church in Norwich was blown off"

Norwich Saint Gregory Church