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Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL


Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church, Potter Heigham's name comes from the Pottery, from which the parish takes its name, dates from when the Romans occupied Britain, and was apparently celebrated in Norfolk for the manufacture of funeral urns for containing the ashes of the dead. The following extract from a letter by Samuel Woodward to Hudson Gurney, Esq., F.R.S, Vice-President of the society of Antiquaries, read 23rd December, 1830 gives interesting information: On reviewing the remains of Roman occupation in Norfolk, they appear to have been entirely military. We discover only the remains of their "casta" (camps", and the ashes of their dead. The latter have been found abundantly in three great cemeteries at Brampton, Elmham and Caister by Norwich, Their pottery seems to have principally of blue clay from a manufactory presummed to have been carried out at Potter Heigham. Here vast quanties of fragments of pottery have been from time to time ploughed up on wasteland.It was discovered that large heaps hitherto neglected, consisted entirely of potsherds. Large mounds of wood ash were also levelled, which had covered several acres. On the departure of the Romans early in the 5th century, it is probable that these works were continued; we cannot by any other supposition account for the wide distribution of this ware, as there is scarce a point of land projecting into our valleys in which fragments of it may not be discovered" (from "Archaeologia", vol.23, p373). In the extreme North-East of the parish is a field still known as the "Pot Hills", and it was here that the mounds of ash referred to were levelled at the beginning of the 19th century. They are said to have been as high as a cottage. Note the remarkable Font of pottery-work in Potter Heigham Church, and the amount of brick in its porch. The font is of 15th century date. Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church, round west tower with octagonal upper storey, 3 bells, nave with aisles, chancel, and south porch. The base of the tower is Norman, but 14th century above. The chancel is late Decorated, and the rest of the church is Perpendicular. The nave and chancel roofs are thatched. There is a brass in the chancel to Richard Baypoole, dated 1613. Also a memorial to the Rev. Robert Mihill, died 1696, who suffered in the Royal cause under the Commonwealth. The moulded brick or terra-cotta font, as described by Messent, is of much interest, it has a roller pulley for raising its cover. The carved open timber roof to the nave is of interest. The rood  screen, with lower painted panels, is good And features Saint Mark, Saint Augustine, Saint John, Saint Gregory, Saint Jerome, Saint Eligius, Saint Luke and Saint Ambrose. Look up and see the still surviving rood beam. Several mural paintings have been discovered and are still showing.

Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL
Potter Heigham Saint Nicholas Church NR29 5LL