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The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.

The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.


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The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham, In 1953 Father Patten, the restorer of the Shrine and first Administrator, created the title of Dame of the Shrine to honour five women who had made significant contributions to the work of restoration. In 1960 the Order proper came into existence and was to include priests (known as ‘Clerks’) and laymen (known as ‘Lay Clerks’) in addition to the Dames.From 1960 the Order was transformed by becoming The Sacred Order of the Living Rosary of Our Lady of Walsingham. It was intended that each of the 15 Rosary altars in the Shrine Church would have allocated to it a Dame, a Clerk and a Lay Clerk – meaning that the Order would total 45 persons. Members wore various items of insignia depending on whether they were a Dame (a red and blue sash with a brooch), a Clerk (a red and blue mozetta (a type of short cape) and medallion or a Lay Clerk (a red and blue collar with medallion). In 2000 the constitution was completely revised and the insignia modernised. Those elected to the Order from 2000 onwards wear simply the Order cross and ribbon (without mozetta, sash or brooch). Today there are 59 members of the Order representing a wide cross-section of Shrine supporters; pilgrimage priests, cell secretaries, volunteers and youth pilgrimage leaders. The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham, much more information about the history of the Order of the Living Rosary can be found within the Walsingham Archives site. Five years before the Norman Conquest, in the year 1061, when Saint Edward the Confessor was King's of England, there lived in Walsingham a virtuous and noble lady called Richild, widow of the lord of the manor. She was desirous of doing and prayed for guidance. In a dream or vision Our Lady led her, as it were, to Nazareth, and showed her the place where the Angel Gabriel had appeared to her to announce the Incarnation, that she should become the Mother of God. Richild was told to take the measure of the place, and build a chapel like it in Our Lady's honour in Walsingham. Three times did the widow see this vision. Having noted carefully the length and breadth of the house in Nazareth, Richild called in some carpenters to construct her chapel. The question then rose: where should the chapel be built? If Our Lady had choosen style, no doubt she would also choose the site. During the night there was a heavy fall of dew on the meadow, but two plots of about equal size remained quite dry. It was on one of them that the chapel should stand. It was decided to build on that site between two wells. But labour how they might, the workmen were unable to accomplish their task; they therefore desisted and returned home. All that night the widow spent in prayer. Next day the carpenters returned., and found the chapel complete. All the planks were perfectly joined together, and the little edifice was standing on the other dry plot of ground at a distance of over 200 feet from the first site. Our Lady, they concluded must have done this herself, and with the assistance of the holy angels erected the little chapel where she herself had wished. .

The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.
The Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham.