[google9e69c0a38572f0b4.html]
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.


Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, This beautiful church of Wiveton, Saint Mary's stands between the village green and the site of the ancient and once flourishing port on the River Glaven to the former prosperity of which it still testifies. It is a splendid legacy to the present small village of Wiveton from the medieval seafarers and merchants of the earlier town. The church was built in the 15th century though their are traces of an earlier church. In 1437 John Hakon of Wiveton, left 200 marks £40 to be spent, "To the makyng of a newe churche" the church incorporates, a clerestory, arch-braced roofs, nave and aisles, with altars that at one time were dedicated to Saint John and Saint Thomas. Both the chancel and the aisles have the same design of windows. On one wall are the priests door, a dropped sill sedilia and a piscina with a rosette drain. The rood loft and beam, now gone, were once lit by the window over the chancel arch. Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, near Holt, square west tower, 6 bells, nave with aisles, chancel and both north and south porches. The church is mainly Perpendicular style. The large windows are large to the chancel and aisles have fine tracery in them. The hand of individuals is often discernible, even if we cannot attribute names to them, A good example is provided by masons marks at New Buckenham and Weasenham Saint Peter. Recently Richard Fawcett made a major contribution to techniques of architectural history by showing that the same decorative features could be seen in more than one church, and therefore reveal the work of "Schools" of masons, or even of individuals. Thus, he had demonstrated at Hockwold, Larling and Croxton. They all have the same simple tracery of the early 14th century; that a particular kind of elongated quatrefoil was used in the Attleborough area after 1320, and has links to Norwich Cathedral and that the towers of Blofield, Brisley, Fakenham, Foulsham, Heydon, Ingham and Southrepps were all the work of one man in the mid-15th century and that a mason who designed Wiveton Saint Mary worked elsewhere in Norfolk in the second quarter of the 15th century. There are some good brasses, including one to George Brigge, died 1579. Another, with arm's of the Grocer's Company, to Raulf Grenewey, a merchant and Alderman of London, died 1558. He was a great benefactor to the church and parish. There is another brass, with figure of a skeleton in a shroud dated 1540. Also one to William Bisshop, priest, died 1512.

Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.
Wiveton, Saint Mary's Church, NR25-7TP.